Excel NCAA templates

March Madness is upon us!

In 1892 Coach James Naismith hammered two peach baskets into the gym balcony, and forever changed how we use Excel!

NCAA_LooneyToons

Using these free templates available in Excel, you can plot out your final four projections!

To access NCAA templates

  1. Click File and select New.
  2. In the Search Office Templates field type ‘NCAA‘ (no quotes) and press the search arrow. The search results will populate the dialog.
  3. Select preferred template and click Download.

ncaa

from Wikipedia:

[Naismith] divided his class of 18 into 2 teams of 9 players each and set about to teach them the basics of his new game of Basketball. The objective of the game was to throw the [ball], into the fruit baskets nailed to the lower railing of the gym balcony. Every time a point was scored, the game was halted so the janitor could bring out a ladder and retrieve the ball. Later, the bottoms of the fruit baskets were removed. The first public basketball game was played in Springfield, MA, on March 11, 1892. That day, he asked his class to play a match in the Armory Street court: 9 versus 9, using a soccer ball and two peach baskets.

Cheers!

hɔuᴉnb

Additional reading:

Comments and questions are always welcome!

Excel Sparklines

Be Trendy!

Sparklines

Sparklines are an easy way to add visual trend-lines to your tabular data.
And what better way to distract your audience than by dangling something sparkly in front of them!

Watch this 60 second video to learn the what you need to know.

Inserting Sparklines to your Excel data

  1. On the Insert tab, in the Sparklines group, click Sparkline type (e.g., Line). The Create Sparklines dialog appears.
  2. In the Data Range field enter the values to be charted.
  3. In the Location Range field enter cell range where char is to be displayed.
  4. Click OK.

Tip: With an inserted sparkline selected, the Sparklines Tools: Design tab appears on the Ribbon. Use the tools on this tab to change colors and add markers.

Cheers!

hɔuᴉnb

Additional reading:

Comments and questions are always welcome!