Suppress Number on Title Slide & Renumber slides.

Try this:  Suppress the number on your first (title) slide,  and renumber the second slide Slide 1This makes referring to talking points easier since it is unlikely there is anything you will refer to on the title slide.
Follow these steps or view this 30 second video.

  1. On the Insert tab, in the Text group, click Slide Number. The Header and Footer dialog appears.
  2. Check Slide number and  Don’t show on title slide check boxes.
  3. Click Apply to all.
  4. On the Design tab, in Customize group, click Slide Size and choose Custom Slide Size. The Slide Size dialog appears.
    (PowerPoint 2003/07 users: Click Page Setup to display the Page Setup dialog)
  5. In the Number slides from field type ‘0’ (zero).
  6. Click OK.

 

 Cheers!

hɔuᴉnb

Comments and questions are always welcome!

Related:

MS Office on the iPad

Microsoft Office, for the iPad is finally here!

After years of working with 3rd party viewers, you can now open and view Documents, Spreadsheets and Slides using MS Office for iPad. Tap the Share button to open an attachment in its respective Office application. The look and feel are just like using a streamlined (portable) version of your desktop Office.  That is to say, it won’t have all the same features, but for on-the-go computing it works great.

The apps are free, however, to unlock the full potential you’ll need to subscribe to Office 365. This is the Office via Cloud (aka SAS) and will enable you to create, save and edit files.

I have never been a big fan of editing on a tablet and Word for the iPad has yet to convince me otherwise. I do, however, appreciate being able to view and create spreadsheets while away from my desktop, using Excel for the iPad. But the real winner thus far (less than 24 hours into install) is PowerPoint for the iPad. Now I can display a presentation directly from my iPad to a projector/monitor and use familiar presentation controls, complete with laser pen, highlighter and notes (sweet!)

Comments and questions are always welcome!hɔuᴉnb

 

PowerPoint: Customize Bullets

Want to make an Oscar worthy, award-winning presentation? The difference between your presentation and all others is design and style. Don’t limit yourself to cookie-cutter, off the shelf bullets. Any saved image can be a source for better bullets.

Watch this 60 second video to learn all you need to know

  1. Select text to be formatted.
  2. On the Home tab, in the Paragraph group, click the Bullets drop-down and select Bullets and Numbering. The Bullets and Numbering dialog appears.
  3. Click Picture. The Picture Bullet dialog appears.
  4. Click Import. A file browser window opens.
  5. Navigate to saved image file (i.e. JPG, GIF) and select picture.
  6. Click Add. The image is added to the picture gallery.
  7. Click OK.

Cheers!

hɔuᴉnb

Comments and questions are always welcome!

Related:

Valentine’s Templates

Has Valentine’s day snuck up on you this year? Are you buried under too much snow to card shop? Borrow from Microsoft’s templates. Word and PowerPoint have hundreds of print-ready and animated templates to choose from.

Screenshot (25)
Word 2013 Templates
PowerPoint 2013 Templates

To Download and Create a Valentine

  1. In either Word or PowerPoint, click File tab and select New.
  2. In the Search bar enter Valentine and press Search icon.
  3. Click on image to preview.
  4. To select, click Create.

Related

Cheers!

hɔuᴉnb

Comments and questions are always welcome!

PowerPoint: Set Transparency

Whitespace (or any other background color) can make your inserted images look like a kindergarten stickers. Solution: remove unwanted colors using Set Transparency.

Watch this 60 second video to learn all you need to know

  1. Select the picture or image to be edited.
  2. On the Ribbon, click on the Picture Tools: Format tab.
  3. In the Adjust group click Color (or Recolor, in version 2007) and select Set Transparent Color.
  4. On the selected image, click on the color to remove (i.e. make transparent). That color is erased from the selected image.

Cheers!

hɔuᴉnb

Comments and questions are always welcome!

Related:

Bubble Charts

Break out the Bubbly!

Its well past the new year so a little bubbly is long overdue. Bubble charts are great in that they allow you to graph in 3 dimensions: Length, Height and Breadth (or area). Although the steps below are written with Excel in mind, they can also be applied to PowerPoint.

Watch this 3½ minute video to learn the basics regarding interpreting and creating bubble charts.

Creating a Bubble Chart

  1. Input your data, placing the X-axis data in the first column, Y-axis data in the second column, and the area (bubble size) in the third column.
  2. Select the data.
  3. On the Insert tab, in the Chart group, Click XY and select from Bubble types. A Bubble chart is added to the worksheet

Note: If necessary click Switch Row/Column (on the Chart Tools:Design tab) to swap the series data.

Adding Data Labels

  1. CLICK on one of the bubbles in the series. The entire series becomes selected.
  2. RIGHT+CLICK  one of the selected bubbles and select Add Data Labels. Data labels will appear.
  3. To format label appearance and content, RIGHT+CLICK on a bubble and select Format Data Labels.

Formatting the Bubble Appearance (Fill)

  1. CLICK on one of the bubbles in the series. The entire series becomes selected..
  2. CLICK (again) on the bubble. The single bubble will be selected.
  3. RIGHT+CLICK on the selected bubble and select Format Data Point. The Format Data Point dialog/pane appears.
  4. Select Fill and set the fill options (e.g., color, pattern, fill, etc).
  5. Close.
  6. Repeat as necessary for remaining bubbles.

Cheers!
hɔuᴉnb

Additional reading:

Comments and questions are always welcome!

Duplicate in PowerPoint

Here’s a quick PowerPoint time saver: Press CTRL + D to duplicate an object.

  1. Insert, resize and move object (i.e., shape or picture) to desired location on slide.
  2. With the object selected, press CTRL + D. A duplicate will appear, slightly offset from the first.
  3. Move the duplicate to preferred distance from original; keep this object selected.
  4. Press CTRL + D again. The next duplicate (triplicate?) appears positioned equidistant from the last.

Repeat final step, as necessary.

Tip: CTRL + D is a CUA (common user access) instruction in many Graphic and Desktop Publishing programs (e.g., Visio, Photoshop).

 Cheers!

hɔuᴉnb

Comments and questions are always welcome!

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