Speak Thai, Latin and Arabic with Excel.

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Ever wonder what your birthday looks like expressed in roman numerals? Want to display your travel expenses using Thai?

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Use these functions to convert numbers to their respective lingo.

Formula Description Example Result
BAHTTEXT Converts number to Thai text =BAHTTEXT(451) สี่ร้อยห้าสิบเอ็ดบาทถ้วน
(Four Hundred and Fifty-one)
ARABIC Convert Roman Numeral to Arabic =ARABIC(MCDXCII) 1492
ROMAN Convert Number to Roman Numeral =ROMAN(1984 , [0] )* MCMLXXXIV

*ROMAN, has an optional argument, format . When format is included, the number is expressed differently, ranging from classic (0) to simplest (4). When this argument is omitted, the classical format is displayed.

Cheers!

hɔuᴉnb

Additional reading:

Comments and questions are always welcome!

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Excel Speaks!

Here’s another cool feature of Excel: Speak Cells on Enter.

Speak Cells on Enter

This can prove valuable as a means to verify accurate data entry. The only setup required is to add a button to your Quick Action Toolbar (QAT).

To setup:

  1. RIGHT + CLICK on the QAT and select Customize Quick Access Toolbar.
  2. Set the Choose commands from drop-down to All commands, then scroll down and select Speak Cells on Enter.
  3. Click Add, then OK.

The button now appears on your QAT. Click button to toggle the feature on or off.

When active, each time you enter in a cell, the cell contents will be read back to you. Unlike other reader programs this voice is clear and rather pleasant (take note Acrobat).

Now if only you could select the voice,  I’d take something along the lines of a HAL 9000, or K.I.T.T. model.

Additional voice features of Excel include:

  • Speak Cells
  • Speak Cells – Stop Speaking Cells
  • Speak Cells by Columns
  • Speak Cells by Rows
  • Stop Listening to Voices in My Head*

*available only to select consumers. What, I am not one of them? I am so! You keep out of this.

Cheers!
hɔuᴉnb

Comments and questions are always welcome!