Numbering Section Pages

Want to show page count in a multi-section document?

On the distant heels of my renumbering slides post, here are instructions to create Page x of y style numbering in a multiple section document. In a simpler document (one without section breaks), you could easily create the ‘Page 3 of 7’ type numbering using the NumPages field.  NumPages, however, counts total number of pages in the document and not in each section.

‘SectionPages,’ to the rescue!

sectionPages
click to enlarge

 

Insert Page x of y Numbering in a Multiple Section Document.

  1. On the Insert tab, click Footer and select Edit Footer. The cursor will move to the footer of the current section.
  2. Position your cursor where you want to place the page number.
  3. On the Header & Footer Tools: Design tab, in the Header & Footer group, click Page Number, Current Position, and select Plain Number. The page number field is inserted, reflecting the current page number.*
  4. Type ‘ of ‘ (no quotes) after the page number.
  5. On the Header & Footer Tools: Design tab, in the Insert group, click Quick Parts, and select Field.
  6. Select Numbering in the Categories drop-down and SectionPages from the Field names area, then click OK. The SectionPages field is added to the footer using the default numeric format.

*Restart numbering , if necessary: Click Page Number, select Format Page Number, and change Page Numbering to Start at: 1.

 

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Cheers!

hɔuᴉnb

Comments and questions are always welcome!

 

Valentine’s Templates

Has Valentine’s day snuck up on you this year? Are you buried under too much snow to card shop? Borrow from Microsoft’s templates. Word and PowerPoint have hundreds of print-ready and animated templates to choose from.

Screenshot (25)
Word 2013 Templates
PowerPoint 2013 Templates

To Download and Create a Valentine

  1. In either Word or PowerPoint, click File tab and select New.
  2. In the Search bar enter Valentine and press Search icon.
  3. Click on image to preview.
  4. To select, click Create.

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Cheers!

hɔuᴉnb

Comments and questions are always welcome!

Duplicating Footnotes in Word

Here’s another interesting challenge presented by a colleague. The same footnote text applied to many items on that page. She wanted to use the same footnote reference twice, with the same number. Here are two solutions. The first (and easier) method is to use a custom mark or symbol (e.g. *, †, etc.). The second method is to use a cross-reference.

Watch this 2m video to learn all you need to know!

Inserting Duplicate Footnote using Symbols.

  1. On the Reference tab, in the Footnotes group, click the Dialog Launcher. The Footnote and Endnote dialog will appear.
  2. In the Custom Mark field type the preferred number or symbol. Alternatively, click Symbol button, select character and click OK.
  3. Click the Insert button. The footnote reference mark is added to document at the insertion point.
  4. Enter the footnote text.
  5. In the body of the document click insertion point where duplicate footnote reference is to appear.
  6. Type duplicate number or, on the Insert tab, click Symbol and select symbol previously selected.

Inserting Duplicate Footnotes using Same Sequence Number.

  1. Insert the first footnote: On the Reference tab, in the Footnotes group, click Insert Footnote. The footnote number is added to document at the insertion point.
  2. Enter the footnote text.
  3. Click insertion point in the body of the document where duplicate footnote number is to appear.
  4. On the Reference tab, in the Captions group, click Cross-references. The Cross-references dialog will appear.
  5. For Reference type  select  ‘Footnote’ and for Insert reference to select ‘Footnote number’.
  6. Select desired footnote from the For which footnote area, then click Insert.
  7. Click Close button.

Note Apply the Footnote Reference style to the duplicates to match footnote formatting.

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Cheers!

hɔuᴉnb

Comments and questions are always welcome!

Using Wildcards with Word Find and Replace features

A colleague  presented me with interesting challenge: An attorney she was working with entered comments into a document as parenthetical phrases. That is to say, the comments were entered ‘inline’, within parentheses and not by using Word’s INSERT COMMENT feature. Having already actioned the comments, she was looking for a simple method to find and remove all the parenthetical text.

Is it possible to search for and delete an unknown string of text, given the first and last characters ?

Yes!

Advanced Find and Wildcards to the rescue.

So our goal: find an open and close parentheses, including all that stuff in the middle, and replace it with nothing (essentially, deleting it).

Using Advanced Find and wildcards to delete text.

  1. Press CTRL + F to display the Navigation Pane.
  2. Click the drop-down to the right of the search icon and select Advanced Find. The Find and Replace dialog appears.
  3. If necessary, click the More button to display additional options.
  4. Check the Use Wildcards check-box.
  5. In the Find What area enter \(*\) 
    Note:  Usually, when conducting a wildcard search, the parenthesis is used to denote an expression. The backslash “\” is  used to indicate when a search device (in this case, the parenthesis) is to be taken literally.
  6. Click Find Next, then click Replace to delete selectively or Replace All to do so en masse.

Note when using wildcards the Find What text is case sensitive.

Additional Wildcards:

To find Type Example
Any character ? s?t finds sat and set
Any string of characters *  s*d finds sad and started
The beginning of a word  <  <(inter) finds interesting and intercept, but not splintered
The end of a word > (in)> finds in and within, but not interesting
One of the specified characters  [ ]  w[io]n finds win and won
Any single character in this range  [-] [r-u]ight finds right, sight and tight
One or more occurrences of the previous character or expression @ lo@t finds lot and loot

Cheers!

hɔuᴉnb

Comments and questions are always welcome!