PowerPoint 2013 Presenter View

Presenter View, a noble concept that never really caught on, is much improved in PowerPoint 2013.

Presenter View makes it easy for you to view your presentation and speaker notes on one one computer, while the audience views your presentation (notes free) on a different monitor or projection screen. Now, Presenter View is not only easier to use, it also offers some additional enhancements.  The improved Presenter view includes a show taskbar option, next slide preview, slide thumbnails, and  zoom!

To enable Presenter view

  • On the Slide Show tab of the Ribbon, in the Monitors group, check the Presenter View checkbox.

Here’s the hit list of what’s new:

Better dual monitor support and display

PowerPoint now ‘intelligently’ selects which monitor is your presenter monitor and which one is viewed by your audience.

Press ALT + F5 to simulate dual monitor display on one monitor

When practicing your presentation you no longer need two displays. Just press ALT + F5 to prepare a ‘dry-run’ of your presentation using just one monitor.

Presenter View
(click to zoom)

Presenter View Features

  • Timer:  Rehearse your timings using pause and reset options .
  • Notes: View your speaker notes (your audience doesn’t see this material).
  • Next Slide: See the next slide before your audience does.
  • Presenter Controls:

Presenter View_controls

    • Pen and Laser Pointers: Annotate your presentation with Pen, Highlighter and Arrow pointers
    • Show all Slides: View thumbnails of your presentation slides.
    • Black Screen: Blackout the audience’s view of your presentation.
    • More: Includes View Last Slide, End Presenter View, and End Show.

hɔuᴉnb

Comments and questions are always welcome!

Word 2010: Style Sets and Ligatures

Let’s profile two of Word’s newer design features: Stylistic Sets and Ligatures. These features, introduced in Word 2010 and available to documents saved in .DOCX format, leverage the newer OpenType font standard. Using these features, you can enhance and embellish select text.

Stylistic Sets

Certain OpenType fonts (e.g., Calibri, Gabriola, Cambria, etc.) have additional embedded appearance options, called Stylistic Sets. These sets enable subtle (and not so subtle) appearance changes, based on Stylistic Set selection, character spacing and letter combination.

Gabriola font with differnt Stylistic Sets applied
Gabriola font with different Stylistic Sets applied

To apply a Stylistic Set

  1. Select text.
  2. On the Home tab of the Ribbon, in the Font group, click the Text Effects and Typography button. Alternatively, you can press CTRL + D to launch the Font dialog box, and then click the Advanced tab.
  3. Point to Stylistic Sets and select desired set.

Ligatures

metalligatures

A Ligature consists of two or more letters commonly joined together in written text. Back in the days of movable type, these characters where forged one a single printing press block, also known as ‘glyph’, to save time and space. Some common examples include  Æ, Œ , ƒƒ, and my personal favorite, Qu.

In Word, ligatures are categorized as:

  • Standard,  contains the ligatures that most typographers and font designers agree are appropriate for that language.
  • Contextual, ligatures that the font designer believed appropriate for use with that font.
  • Historical, ligatures for language that was once standard but is no longer commonly used (e.g., ‘ye olde theatre’)
  • Discretionary, ligatures that the font designer included for specific purposes.

Here’s a sentence using Calibri, with all ligature categories applied.

Calibri font 'All' Ligatures formatted
Calibri font with different ligature types selelcted

To apply a Ligature

  1. Select text.
  2. On the Home tab of the Ribbon, in the Font group, click the Text Effects and Typography button. Alternatively, you can press CTRL + D to launch the Font dialog box, and then click the Advanced tab.
  3. Point to Ligatures and select desired format.

Cheers!
hɔuᴉnb

Comments and questions are always welcome!

Word: Move Rows in a Table Shortcut

Microsoft_Word_2013_Icon

Here is an old favorite* Word Tip.

Looking for an easy method to move a table row up?

  1. Place cursor on the row.
  2. Press ALT + SHIFT + Up Arrow.

Repeat as necessary until the cursor is elevated to desired position. As you probably guessed, pressing ALT + SHIFT + Down Arrow moves the selected row down.

This trick is not just limited to tables.  It also works with:

  • Bulleted text
  • Numbered lists
  • Outline text
  • Non-numbered paragraphs
  • IQ points

Okay, admittedly that last one was just wishful thinking :).

* Tip applies to Word versions 2003, 2007, 2010, and 2013. This tip may be relevant in  earlier Word versions, but to confirm this I would have to pull out my old PC from its resting spot, on a shelf, under a pair of  acid-wash jeans, wedged between an un-seeded Chia Pet and my Commodore VIC 20.

Cheers!
hɔuᴉnb

Comments and questions are always welcome!

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