Use Advanced Search Wildcards to Format Names: Last, First Middle

lastnames-first-gif

Reformatting a list of names is challenging when some of the names have middle names and others do not. Using Word’s Advanced Replace dialog and wildcards makes it easy to rewrite a list in Lastname, First M. format.

3 minute e-Learning demo:

To Reformat a List of Names to Last, First M.

  1. Select your list of names.
  2. Press CTRL+H. The REPLACE dialog appears.
  3. If necessary click More button to display full dialog.
  4. Check Use Wildcards.
  5. In the Find what field type: (*) ([! ]@)^13
    Important: observe spaces.
  6. In the Replace with field type: \2, \1^p
    Important:
    note the space after the comma.
  7. Click Replace All. When prompted to “..continue searching the remainder of the document” click No.
  8. Close the dialog.

Why it works

The find pattern looks for two groups:  first name with optional middle name or initial and last name.

  • (*)_ finds expression1, first and middles names
  • ([!_]@)^13 finds expression2, the remainder of name up to and including hard return (ascii char 13)

These names can now be referred to as expressions \1 and \2. In our replace statement we  transpose them,  separate them with a comma and space, and end with a hard return (^p).

  • \2,_\1^p 

Note:  _ is used above to illustrate use of space.

Codes that work with Find and Replace

To find Type
Paragraph mark ( Paragraph mark ) ^p (doesn’t work in the Find what box when the Use wildcards option is turned on), or ^13
One or more occurrences of the previous character or expression @
ex: lo@t finds lot and loot.
Any single character except the characters in the range inside the brackets [!_]
ex: t[!a-g]ck finds tock and tuck, but not tack or tick.

Comments and questions are always welcome!

Cheers!

hɔuᴉnb

Related:

MS Word: Custom Bullets with Drag & Drop

halloweenJazz up your bulleted list

Creating custom bullets is as easy as drag + drop

bullets-in-word-with-drag-and-drop3

To Format List with Custom Bullet

  1. Locate the image to serve as bullet and save to a local drive.
    Tip: for best results, seek medium or small sized images with transparency (i.e. PNG, GIF).
  2. Select your list, then, on the Home tab, click Bullets to format with default bullet style.
  3. Place cursor on blank line, click Insert and then Picture. Navigate to your custom bullet image and click Open.
  4. Using the corner selection handle resize the image to an appropriate size.
  5. Click + drag image onto one of the bullets in your list; you’ll recognize you’ve hit the target when the bullet area turns grey.

Cheers!

hɔuᴉnb

Comments and questions are always welcome!

Related:

Suppress Number on Title Slide & Renumber slides.

Try this:  Suppress the number on your first (title) slide,  and renumber the second slide Slide 1This makes referring to talking points easier since it is unlikely there is anything you will refer to on the title slide.
Follow these steps or view this 30 second video.

  1. On the Insert tab, in the Text group, click Slide Number. The Header and Footer dialog appears.
  2. Check Slide number and  Don’t show on title slide check boxes.
  3. Click Apply to all.
  4. On the Design tab, in Customize group, click Slide Size and choose Custom Slide Size. The Slide Size dialog appears.
    (PowerPoint 2003/07 users: Click Page Setup to display the Page Setup dialog)
  5. In the Number slides from field type ‘0’ (zero).
  6. Click OK.

 

 Cheers!

hɔuᴉnb

Comments and questions are always welcome!

Related:

PowerPoint: Customize Bullets

Want to make an Oscar worthy, award-winning presentation? The difference between your presentation and all others is design and style. Don’t limit yourself to cookie-cutter, off the shelf bullets. Any saved image can be a source for better bullets.

Watch this 60 second video to learn all you need to know

  1. Select text to be formatted.
  2. On the Home tab, in the Paragraph group, click the Bullets drop-down and select Bullets and Numbering. The Bullets and Numbering dialog appears.
  3. Click Picture. The Picture Bullet dialog appears.
  4. Click Import. A file browser window opens.
  5. Navigate to saved image file (i.e. JPG, GIF) and select picture.
  6. Click Add. The image is added to the picture gallery.
  7. Click OK.

Cheers!

hɔuᴉnb

Comments and questions are always welcome!

Related:

PowerPoint: Set Transparency

Whitespace (or any other background color) can make your inserted images look like a kindergarten stickers. Solution: remove unwanted colors using Set Transparency.

Watch this 60 second video to learn all you need to know

  1. Select the picture or image to be edited.
  2. On the Ribbon, click on the Picture Tools: Format tab.
  3. In the Adjust group click Color (or Recolor, in version 2007) and select Set Transparent Color.
  4. On the selected image, click on the color to remove (i.e. make transparent). That color is erased from the selected image.

Cheers!

hɔuᴉnb

Comments and questions are always welcome!

Related:

Duplicate in PowerPoint

Here’s a quick PowerPoint time saver: Press CTRL + D to duplicate an object.

  1. Insert, resize and move object (i.e., shape or picture) to desired location on slide.
  2. With the object selected, press CTRL + D. A duplicate will appear, slightly offset from the first.
  3. Move the duplicate to preferred distance from original; keep this object selected.
  4. Press CTRL + D again. The next duplicate (triplicate?) appears positioned equidistant from the last.

Repeat final step, as necessary.

Tip: CTRL + D is a CUA (common user access) instruction in many Graphic and Desktop Publishing programs (e.g., Visio, Photoshop).

 Cheers!

hɔuᴉnb

Comments and questions are always welcome!

Related:

PowerPoint 2013 Presenter View

Presenter View, a noble concept that never really caught on, is much improved in PowerPoint 2013.

Presenter View makes it easy for you to view your presentation and speaker notes on one one computer, while the audience views your presentation (notes free) on a different monitor or projection screen. Now, Presenter View is not only easier to use, it also offers some additional enhancements.  The improved Presenter view includes a show taskbar option, next slide preview, slide thumbnails, and  zoom!

To enable Presenter view

  • On the Slide Show tab of the Ribbon, in the Monitors group, check the Presenter View checkbox.

Here’s the hit list of what’s new:

Better dual monitor support and display

PowerPoint now ‘intelligently’ selects which monitor is your presenter monitor and which one is viewed by your audience.

Press ALT + F5 to simulate dual monitor display on one monitor

When practicing your presentation you no longer need two displays. Just press ALT + F5 to prepare a ‘dry-run’ of your presentation using just one monitor.

Presenter View
(click to zoom)

Presenter View Features

  • Timer:  Rehearse your timings using pause and reset options .
  • Notes: View your speaker notes (your audience doesn’t see this material).
  • Next Slide: See the next slide before your audience does.
  • Presenter Controls:

Presenter View_controls

    • Pen and Laser Pointers: Annotate your presentation with Pen, Highlighter and Arrow pointers
    • Show all Slides: View thumbnails of your presentation slides.
    • Black Screen: Blackout the audience’s view of your presentation.
    • More: Includes View Last Slide, End Presenter View, and End Show.

hɔuᴉnb

Comments and questions are always welcome!

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