Suppress Number on Title Slide & Renumber slides.

Try this:  Suppress the number on your first (title) slide,  and renumber the second slide Slide 1This makes referring to talking points easier since it is unlikely there is anything you will refer to on the title slide.
Follow these steps or view this 30 second video.

  1. On the Insert tab, in the Text group, click Slide Number. The Header and Footer dialog appears.
  2. Check Slide number and  Don’t show on title slide check boxes.
  3. Click Apply to all.
  4. On the Design tab, in Customize group, click Slide Size and choose Custom Slide Size. The Slide Size dialog appears.
    (PowerPoint 2003/07 users: Click Page Setup to display the Page Setup dialog)
  5. In the Number slides from field type ‘0’ (zero).
  6. Click OK.

 

 Cheers!

hɔuᴉnb

Comments and questions are always welcome!

Related:

PowerPoint: Customize Bullets

Want to make an Oscar worthy, award-winning presentation? The difference between your presentation and all others is design and style. Don’t limit yourself to cookie-cutter, off the shelf bullets. Any saved image can be a source for better bullets.

Watch this 60 second video to learn all you need to know

  1. Select text to be formatted.
  2. On the Home tab, in the Paragraph group, click the Bullets drop-down and select Bullets and Numbering. The Bullets and Numbering dialog appears.
  3. Click Picture. The Picture Bullet dialog appears.
  4. Click Import. A file browser window opens.
  5. Navigate to saved image file (i.e. JPG, GIF) and select picture.
  6. Click Add. The image is added to the picture gallery.
  7. Click OK.

Cheers!

hɔuᴉnb

Comments and questions are always welcome!

Related:

PowerPoint: Set Transparency

Whitespace (or any other background color) can make your inserted images look like a kindergarten stickers. Solution: remove unwanted colors using Set Transparency.

Watch this 60 second video to learn all you need to know

  1. Select the picture or image to be edited.
  2. On the Ribbon, click on the Picture Tools: Format tab.
  3. In the Adjust group click Color (or Recolor, in version 2007) and select Set Transparent Color.
  4. On the selected image, click on the color to remove (i.e. make transparent). That color is erased from the selected image.

Cheers!

hɔuᴉnb

Comments and questions are always welcome!

Related:

Duplicate in PowerPoint

Here’s a quick PowerPoint time saver: Press CTRL + D to duplicate an object.

  1. Insert, resize and move object (i.e., shape or picture) to desired location on slide.
  2. With the object selected, press CTRL + D. A duplicate will appear, slightly offset from the first.
  3. Move the duplicate to preferred distance from original; keep this object selected.
  4. Press CTRL + D again. The next duplicate (triplicate?) appears positioned equidistant from the last.

Repeat final step, as necessary.

Tip: CTRL + D is a CUA (common user access) instruction in many Graphic and Desktop Publishing programs (e.g., Visio, Photoshop).

 Cheers!

hɔuᴉnb

Comments and questions are always welcome!

Related:

MS Office: Insert Screenshot

Need to insert a screenshot into your presentation, document, spreadsheet or email? The Office 2010/2013 Insert Screenshot button makes this easy.

Watch this 60 second video to see all you need to know.


To Insert a Screenshot

  1. Display content window that has the material to capture. Do not minimize this window.
  2. Open or switch to destination application (i.e., MS Word, PowerPoint, Excel, or Outlook).
  3. Place cursor where you wish to insert the screen capture.
  4. On the Insert tab of the Ribbon, click Screenshot button. The available (i.e. not minimized) windows will display as thumbnails.
    • To insert an entire window; select associated thumbnail from the drop-down.
    • To insert a portion of the window previously displayed; select Screen Clipping, then CLICK + DRAG cross-hair around the portion to insert.
Additional reading..

Cheers!

hɔuᴉnb

Comments and questions are always welcome!

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

PowerPoint 2013 Presenter View

Presenter View, a noble concept that never really caught on, is much improved in PowerPoint 2013.

Presenter View makes it easy for you to view your presentation and speaker notes on one one computer, while the audience views your presentation (notes free) on a different monitor or projection screen. Now, Presenter View is not only easier to use, it also offers some additional enhancements.  The improved Presenter view includes a show taskbar option, next slide preview, slide thumbnails, and  zoom!

To enable Presenter view

  • On the Slide Show tab of the Ribbon, in the Monitors group, check the Presenter View checkbox.

Here’s the hit list of what’s new:

Better dual monitor support and display

PowerPoint now ‘intelligently’ selects which monitor is your presenter monitor and which one is viewed by your audience.

Press ALT + F5 to simulate dual monitor display on one monitor

When practicing your presentation you no longer need two displays. Just press ALT + F5 to prepare a ‘dry-run’ of your presentation using just one monitor.

Presenter View
(click to zoom)

Presenter View Features

  • Timer:  Rehearse your timings using pause and reset options .
  • Notes: View your speaker notes (your audience doesn’t see this material).
  • Next Slide: See the next slide before your audience does.
  • Presenter Controls:

Presenter View_controls

    • Pen and Laser Pointers: Annotate your presentation with Pen, Highlighter and Arrow pointers
    • Show all Slides: View thumbnails of your presentation slides.
    • Black Screen: Blackout the audience’s view of your presentation.
    • More: Includes View Last Slide, End Presenter View, and End Show.

hɔuᴉnb

Comments and questions are always welcome!

Office 2010: Mark as Final

Here’s a quick Office tip that applies to Word, Excel and PowerPoint.

MarkAsFinal

The Mark as Final feature enables you to protect a document to discourage editing. This simple seal of protection can easily be removed by the reader, should it be determined editing is necessary.

Note, this option is not designed to prevent edits, only to ward against unintentional editing. To render the document un-editable use other alternatives (for example, saving the file password protected or distributing a PDF version of the file).

To Apply Mark as Final

  1. On the File tab, scroll down to Info, click Protect and select Mark as Final. A dialog will appear indicating “the file will be marked as final and saved.”
  2. Click OK to confirm.

When backstage view is active, a notice appears in the status bar, indicating, “An author has marked this … as final to discourage editing.”  The Application title bar also indicates that the file is Read-only.  Reading, printing, and viewing options continue to function, but all editing features are disabled.

To remove the Mark as Final setting and restore edit functions repeat step 1, above. Alternatively, you can click the Edit Anyway button displayed on the info bar in the backstage view .

Cheers!
hɔuᴉnb

Comments and questions are always welcome!