Excel Advanced Filter

   

So you’ve mastered the FILTER tool (aka, ‘Filter-in-place’). Are you ready to step up to ADVANCED FILTERS?

Although the Filter-in-place tool is easy to use, it does not handle multiple column INCLUSIVE criteria very well.

Using the ADVANCED FILTER you can:

  • Copy filtered records to another part of the spreadsheet, leaving the original database undisturbed.
  • Generate a BOOLEAN OR (aka, inclusive) condition across multiple fields.

What does that that last part mean? Let’s take the following scenario.

The last time Russia played host to the Winter Games was in 1994.  In preparing for the 2014 Olympics , you are tasked to create of separate list that includes:

  • ALL RUSSIAN MEDAL WINNERS (any year), and
  • 1994 GOLD MEDALISTS, in the WINTER OLYMPICS, of any nationality.

An Olympic feat (pun intended)? Not for ADVANCED FILTER!

(cue the Olympic music

Performing the ADVANCED FILTER requires a little preparation. You will need to prepare a CRITERIA RANGE to ask the question, and an OUTPUT RANGE to display the result. These ranges must be be in a separate area of the same worksheet  preferably to the right of the original.

Click here to download the 2014 Olympic Data file, then execute the instructions below.

Preparing the Criteria and Output Ranges

  1. Select and copy the column headings in cells A1:G1.
  2. Paste the headings, starting in cell J1 and again in cell J6.
  3. In cell L2 type ‘RUS’
  4. On the following row, in the appropriate cells, type ‘1994‘ ( J3), ‘Gold‘ (O3) and ‘Winter‘ (P3).
Preparing the Criteria and Output ranges
(click to zoom)

Performing the Advanced Filter

  1. Place cursor on one of the cells from the original database (e.g. B4).
  2. On the the Data tab of the Ribbon, in the Sort and Filter group, click Advanced. The Advanced Filter dialog will appear.
  3. For Action select Copy to another location.
  4. Review the List Range. If necessary correct the reference to include the source data.
  5. In the Criteria Range field type or select cells J1:P3.
  6. In the Copy To field, type or select the Output Range header, cells J6:P6.
  7. Click OK.

Voilà! The records that satisfy these criteria are copied to the Output range, and you get a virtual laurel wreath!

Closing Ceremony Notes:

  • Our criteria range included the headings and two additional rows. Each OR (inclusive) condition is entered on a separate row. Although our criteria uses data from 4 columns, there are only two separate, inclusive criteria; (1) RUSSIAN OR (2) GOLD MEDALIST in YEAR 1994. Were additional inclusive criteria necessary (e.g., Gender)  the criteria range in Step 5 would need to be increased, accordingly.
  • The copied data is not linked to the original. Edits to the original source data do not affect the copied output. Should you edit the source data you need only re-run the Advance Filter to synchronize data.
  • Do not put anything below the Output Range headers that you intend to keep; Excel erases all the rows beneath prior creating the output.
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Word 2010: Style Sets and Ligatures

Let’s profile two of Word’s newer design features: Stylistic Sets and Ligatures. These features, introduced in Word 2010 and available to documents saved in .DOCX format, leverage the newer OpenType font standard. Using these features, you can enhance and embellish select text.

Stylistic Sets

Certain OpenType fonts (e.g., Calibri, Gabriola, Cambria, etc.) have additional embedded appearance options, called Stylistic Sets. These sets enable subtle (and not so subtle) appearance changes, based on Stylistic Set selection, character spacing and letter combination.

Gabriola font with differnt Stylistic Sets applied
Gabriola font with different Stylistic Sets applied

To apply a Stylistic Set

  1. Select text.
  2. On the Home tab of the Ribbon, in the Font group, click the Text Effects and Typography button. Alternatively, you can press CTRL + D to launch the Font dialog box, and then click the Advanced tab.
  3. Point to Stylistic Sets and select desired set.

Ligatures

metalligatures

A Ligature consists of two or more letters commonly joined together in written text. Back in the days of movable type, these characters where forged one a single printing press block, also known as ‘glyph’, to save time and space. Some common examples include  Æ, Œ , ƒƒ, and my personal favorite, Qu.

In Word, ligatures are categorized as:

  • Standard,  contains the ligatures that most typographers and font designers agree are appropriate for that language.
  • Contextual, ligatures that the font designer believed appropriate for use with that font.
  • Historical, ligatures for language that was once standard but is no longer commonly used (e.g., ‘ye olde theatre’)
  • Discretionary, ligatures that the font designer included for specific purposes.

Here’s a sentence using Calibri, with all ligature categories applied.

Calibri font 'All' Ligatures formatted
Calibri font with different ligature types selelcted

To apply a Ligature

  1. Select text.
  2. On the Home tab of the Ribbon, in the Font group, click the Text Effects and Typography button. Alternatively, you can press CTRL + D to launch the Font dialog box, and then click the Advanced tab.
  3. Point to Ligatures and select desired format.

Cheers!
hɔuᴉnb

Comments and questions are always welcome!

PivotTables & Slicers

Want a quick introduction to PivotTables? Watch this 10 minute video. I demonstrate the basic features of PivotTables and feature Slicers, new to Excel 2010. And for more, view the earlier post: PivotTable Intro, Step by Step.

Excel Speaks!

Here’s another cool feature of Excel: Speak Cells on Enter.

Speak Cells on Enter

This can prove valuable as a means to verify accurate data entry. The only setup required is to add a button to your Quick Action Toolbar (QAT).

To setup:

  1. RIGHT + CLICK on the QAT and select Customize Quick Access Toolbar.
  2. Set the Choose commands from drop-down to All commands, then scroll down and select Speak Cells on Enter.
  3. Click Add, then OK.

The button now appears on your QAT. Click button to toggle the feature on or off.

When active, each time you enter in a cell, the cell contents will be read back to you. Unlike other reader programs this voice is clear and rather pleasant (take note Acrobat).

Now if only you could select the voice,  I’d take something along the lines of a HAL 9000, or K.I.T.T. model.

Additional voice features of Excel include:

  • Speak Cells
  • Speak Cells – Stop Speaking Cells
  • Speak Cells by Columns
  • Speak Cells by Rows
  • Stop Listening to Voices in My Head*

*available only to select consumers. What, I am not one of them? I am so! You keep out of this.

Cheers!
hɔuᴉnb

Comments and questions are always welcome!

PivotTable Introduction: Step by Step

Concept

PivotTables are one of the most powerful tools in Excel’s data management arsenal. Surprisingly, it is also one of the most overlooked tools. A PivotTable enables the reviewer to statistically analyze data in various flexible formats. By pivoting bits of data into place you are able to create new views of worksheet data in seconds.

Figure 1 PivotTable report example

Preparation:

To create a PivotTable you must start with a database. For Excel’s purposes a database can be defined as:

A table, where the first row contains the column headings (field names), each row contains data, and is devoid of blank rows or columns.

First, review your data and, if necessary cleanup the data. This will include deleting unnecessary blank rows. It may also include inserting blank rows between titles and summaries.

Execution

Click here to open ‘PivotTable Intro.XLS ‘ and follow below instructions.

To insert a PivotTable report

  1. Place cursor on one of the data values of the table.
  2. On the Insert tab, click PivotTable. The Create PivotTable dialog appears.
  3. Confirm the settings and click OK. A new sheet is displayed, and the PivotTable Field List pane appears at right.
  4. Drag the fields in the pane into the appropriate area at bottom.
  • Row: Region, Product
  • Column: Market
  • Value: Quantity

To update the PivotTable

After editing the original database, you must manually update the PivotTable to reflect those editions.

  1. Click on one of the values in the PivotTable.
  2. On the Analyze tab, in the Data group, click Refresh.

Tip Double + Click on a PivotTable value to Quick query the data. Excel will copy the supporting records onto a new sheet for your review. This data is not dynamic. To prevent unintentional editing it is recommended that you delete this sheet, following your review.

Slicers

Slicers, new to version 2010,  enable you to filter select records to display. In earlier versions of Excel, this is accomplished using Filters. 

To Filter the PivotTable report using Slicers

  1. Click on one of the values in the PivotTable, to display the PivotTable Ribbon tools.
  2. On the Analyze tab, in the Filter group, click Insert Slicer. The Insert Slicers dialog appears.
  3. Check the field(s) you wish to create filters for and click OK. The Slicer pane(s) is added to the worksheet.
  4. Click on item(s) in the Slicer pane to display only those records.

Review

  • When generating a PivotTable, the source data must be in a ‘clean’ table.
  • Slicers can be used to enhance the report layout.
  • Double + Click a data point to quickly query the data.

Windows Shortcut: Lock Keyboard

computer_key_Windows

Here’s a quick way to gain more personal and work security (in so far as your computer is concerned). It involves the underutilized Windows Key (pictured above in its version 7 variation).

To Lock the Screen and Keyboard

  • Hold the Windows Key and press ‘L‘.

The screen and keyboard will lock. Any running  processes will continue to function in the background. If your system is password protected (and why wouldn’t it be) you will be required to re-enter your password to unlock your system.

Note: Applies to Windows XP, Windows Vista,  Windows 7, and Windows 8

Cheers!
hɔuᴉnb

Comments and questions are always welcome!

Word: Move Rows in a Table Shortcut

Microsoft_Word_2013_Icon

Here is an old favorite* Word Tip.

Looking for an easy method to move a table row up?

  1. Place cursor on the row.
  2. Press ALT + SHIFT + Up Arrow.

Repeat as necessary until the cursor is elevated to desired position. As you probably guessed, pressing ALT + SHIFT + Down Arrow moves the selected row down.

This trick is not just limited to tables.  It also works with:

  • Bulleted text
  • Numbered lists
  • Outline text
  • Non-numbered paragraphs
  • IQ points

Okay, admittedly that last one was just wishful thinking :).

* Tip applies to Word versions 2003, 2007, 2010, and 2013. This tip may be relevant in  earlier Word versions, but to confirm this I would have to pull out my old PC from its resting spot, on a shelf, under a pair of  acid-wash jeans, wedged between an un-seeded Chia Pet and my Commodore VIC 20.

Cheers!
hɔuᴉnb

Comments and questions are always welcome!