MS Office on the iPad

Microsoft Office, for the iPad is finally here!

After years of working with 3rd party viewers, you can now open and view Documents, Spreadsheets and Slides using MS Office for iPad. Tap the Share button to open an attachment in its respective Office application. The look and feel are just like using a streamlined (portable) version of your desktop Office.  That is to say, it won’t have all the same features, but for on-the-go computing it works great.

The apps are free, however, to unlock the full potential you’ll need to subscribe to Office 365. This is the Office via Cloud (aka SAS) and will enable you to create, save and edit files.

I have never been a big fan of editing on a tablet and Word for the iPad has yet to convince me otherwise. I do, however, appreciate being able to view and create spreadsheets while away from my desktop, using Excel for the iPad. But the real winner thus far (less than 24 hours into install) is PowerPoint for the iPad. Now I can display a presentation directly from my iPad to a projector/monitor and use familiar presentation controls, complete with laser pen, highlighter and notes (sweet!)

Comments and questions are always welcome!hɔuᴉnb

 

Accents made easy in Word

JasonUnderwood
loved your pate!

Our world shrinks and our community becomes increasingly global. For those using the 26 letter (aka, US 101) keyboard, proper communications can be challenging.

Master these easy keyboard shortcuts so as not to mistake pate with pâté, fur with für, or Crème fraîche with, well, anything. 

To avoid a lot of memorization, remember: look for the key that looks like the accented character and match it with a CTRL (and sometimes SHIFT) stroke. Many of the special characters can be created by using apostrophe ( ′ ),  colon (:)  caret (^) and tilde (~).

Char

Name

Keystroke

Example

´

acute accent CTRL +, followed by letter más (Sp., more)

`

grave accent CTRL + `, followed by letter (Fr., where)

¨

diaeresis/umlaut CTRL + SHIFT + :, followed by letter Tür (Gr., door)

^

circumflex CTRL+ SHIFT ^, followed by letter tête (Fr., head)

~

tilde CTRL + SHIFT ~, followed by letter Piña Colada (a dreadful 70s song)
Bonus language-specific shortcuts:

ç

(Fr.) cedilla CTRL + , (comma), followed by c garçon (boy)

ß

(Gr.) eszett CTRL + SHIFT + &, followed s groß (large)

Related

Cheers!

hɔuᴉnb

Comments and questions are always welcome!

Valentine’s Templates

Has Valentine’s day snuck up on you this year? Are you buried under too much snow to card shop? Borrow from Microsoft’s templates. Word and PowerPoint have hundreds of print-ready and animated templates to choose from.

Screenshot (25)
Word 2013 Templates
PowerPoint 2013 Templates

To Download and Create a Valentine

  1. In either Word or PowerPoint, click File tab and select New.
  2. In the Search bar enter Valentine and press Search icon.
  3. Click on image to preview.
  4. To select, click Create.

Related

Cheers!

hɔuᴉnb

Comments and questions are always welcome!

Duplicating Footnotes in Word

Here’s another interesting challenge presented by a colleague. The same footnote text applied to many items on that page. She wanted to use the same footnote reference twice, with the same number. Here are two solutions. The first (and easier) method is to use a custom mark or symbol (e.g. *, †, etc.). The second method is to use a cross-reference.

Watch this 2m video to learn all you need to know!

Inserting Duplicate Footnote using Symbols.

  1. On the Reference tab, in the Footnotes group, click the Dialog Launcher. The Footnote and Endnote dialog will appear.
  2. In the Custom Mark field type the preferred number or symbol. Alternatively, click Symbol button, select character and click OK.
  3. Click the Insert button. The footnote reference mark is added to document at the insertion point.
  4. Enter the footnote text.
  5. In the body of the document click insertion point where duplicate footnote reference is to appear.
  6. Type duplicate number or, on the Insert tab, click Symbol and select symbol previously selected.

Inserting Duplicate Footnotes using Same Sequence Number.

  1. Insert the first footnote: On the Reference tab, in the Footnotes group, click Insert Footnote. The footnote number is added to document at the insertion point.
  2. Enter the footnote text.
  3. Click insertion point in the body of the document where duplicate footnote number is to appear.
  4. On the Reference tab, in the Captions group, click Cross-references. The Cross-references dialog will appear.
  5. For Reference type  select  ‘Footnote’ and for Insert reference to select ‘Footnote number’.
  6. Select desired footnote from the For which footnote area, then click Insert.
  7. Click Close button.

Note Apply the Footnote Reference style to the duplicates to match footnote formatting.

Related

Cheers!

hɔuᴉnb

Comments and questions are always welcome!

MS Office: Insert Screenshot

Need to insert a screenshot into your presentation, document, spreadsheet or email? The Office 2010/2013 Insert Screenshot button makes this easy.

Watch this 60 second video to see all you need to know.


To Insert a Screenshot

  1. Display content window that has the material to capture. Do not minimize this window.
  2. Open or switch to destination application (i.e., MS Word, PowerPoint, Excel, or Outlook).
  3. Place cursor where you wish to insert the screen capture.
  4. On the Insert tab of the Ribbon, click Screenshot button. The available (i.e. not minimized) windows will display as thumbnails.
    • To insert an entire window; select associated thumbnail from the drop-down.
    • To insert a portion of the window previously displayed; select Screen Clipping, then CLICK + DRAG cross-hair around the portion to insert.
Additional reading..

Cheers!

hɔuᴉnb

Comments and questions are always welcome!

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Using Wildcards with Word Find and Replace features

A colleague  presented me with interesting challenge: An attorney she was working with entered comments into a document as parenthetical phrases. That is to say, the comments were entered ‘inline’, within parentheses and not by using Word’s INSERT COMMENT feature. Having already actioned the comments, she was looking for a simple method to find and remove all the parenthetical text.

Is it possible to search for and delete an unknown string of text, given the first and last characters ?

Yes!

Advanced Find and Wildcards to the rescue.

So our goal: find an open and close parentheses, including all that stuff in the middle, and replace it with nothing (essentially, deleting it).

Using Advanced Find and wildcards to delete text.

  1. Press CTRL + F to display the Navigation Pane.
  2. Click the drop-down to the right of the search icon and select Advanced Find. The Find and Replace dialog appears.
  3. If necessary, click the More button to display additional options.
  4. Check the Use Wildcards check-box.
  5. In the Find What area enter \(*\) 
    Note:  Usually, when conducting a wildcard search, the parenthesis is used to denote an expression. The backslash “\” is  used to indicate when a search device (in this case, the parenthesis) is to be taken literally.
  6. Click Find Next, then click Replace to delete selectively or Replace All to do so en masse.

Note when using wildcards the Find What text is case sensitive.

Additional Wildcards:

To find Type Example
Any character ? s?t finds sat and set
Any string of characters *  s*d finds sad and started
The beginning of a word  <  <(inter) finds interesting and intercept, but not splintered
The end of a word > (in)> finds in and within, but not interesting
One of the specified characters  [ ]  w[io]n finds win and won
Any single character in this range  [-] [r-u]ight finds right, sight and tight
One or more occurrences of the previous character or expression @ lo@t finds lot and loot

Cheers!

hɔuᴉnb

Comments and questions are always welcome!

Word 2010: Style Sets and Ligatures

Let’s profile two of Word’s newer design features: Stylistic Sets and Ligatures. These features, introduced in Word 2010 and available to documents saved in .DOCX format, leverage the newer OpenType font standard. Using these features, you can enhance and embellish select text.

Stylistic Sets

Certain OpenType fonts (e.g., Calibri, Gabriola, Cambria, etc.) have additional embedded appearance options, called Stylistic Sets. These sets enable subtle (and not so subtle) appearance changes, based on Stylistic Set selection, character spacing and letter combination.

Gabriola font with differnt Stylistic Sets applied
Gabriola font with different Stylistic Sets applied

To apply a Stylistic Set

  1. Select text.
  2. On the Home tab of the Ribbon, in the Font group, click the Text Effects and Typography button. Alternatively, you can press CTRL + D to launch the Font dialog box, and then click the Advanced tab.
  3. Point to Stylistic Sets and select desired set.

Ligatures

metalligatures

A Ligature consists of two or more letters commonly joined together in written text. Back in the days of movable type, these characters where forged one a single printing press block, also known as ‘glyph’, to save time and space. Some common examples include  Æ, Œ , ƒƒ, and my personal favorite, Qu.

In Word, ligatures are categorized as:

  • Standard,  contains the ligatures that most typographers and font designers agree are appropriate for that language.
  • Contextual, ligatures that the font designer believed appropriate for use with that font.
  • Historical, ligatures for language that was once standard but is no longer commonly used (e.g., ‘ye olde theatre’)
  • Discretionary, ligatures that the font designer included for specific purposes.

Here’s a sentence using Calibri, with all ligature categories applied.

Calibri font 'All' Ligatures formatted
Calibri font with different ligature types selelcted

To apply a Ligature

  1. Select text.
  2. On the Home tab of the Ribbon, in the Font group, click the Text Effects and Typography button. Alternatively, you can press CTRL + D to launch the Font dialog box, and then click the Advanced tab.
  3. Point to Ligatures and select desired format.

Cheers!
hɔuᴉnb

Comments and questions are always welcome!